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HIV infection is not a concern in the workplace, for most people. However, for sex workers, the risk of HIV infection is an everyday reality.

As long as sex work is a criminal act, there will be a stigmatised community that is vulnerable to HIV infection. Sex workers are a key population that bear a disproportionately high proportion of the HIV burden compared to other groups in the community. However, due to the criminalised nature of the trade, it is difficult to gather meaningful data.

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5 Strategies to Cure HIV



A cure for HIV would be the total eradication of HIV from the body. However, this is not the only option that scientists are looking into. Here are five strategies scientists are looking into for an HIV cure...

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HIV Remission: What is it?



Whilst there isn’t yet a cure for HIV, the virus can go into ‘remission’. This is where the virus is suppressed for a short time by the immune system without the need for antiretrovirals (ARVs). This period of time could be months or years. The majority of people do not undergo remission and for those who do, it is usually from exceptional circumstances.

If an HIV-positive patient reliably takes their ARTs then the virus remains suppressed in hidden reservoirs that are difficult for drugs to reach.

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HIV infection can only take hold if the virus finds its way into the blood stream. It can be transmitted through unprotected vaginal and anal sex, injections with needles with HIV present or through mixing blood.

The immune system is made up of white blood cells; these circulate around the body targeting foreign invaders (viruses, bacteria and parasites for example) and destroy them. HIV targets a certain type of immune cell, called a T cell, and integrates itself into the immune cell’s DNA. By hiding inside the immune cell itself, the body can no longer identify it as a hostile body.

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Less than half of people living with HIV are on treatment. This means that over half of HIV positive people are not on any treatment. With over 2.1 million new HIV infections globally in the year 2015, this growth must be addressed.

At the moment, the most effective way to treat HIV is by suppressing the virus using antiretroviral therapy (ART). This is a daily pill, taken for the rest of the person’s life, that suppresses the virus. As soon as as someone is diagnosed with HIV they should start ARVs.

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Make Way for the Tutu Tester!



The communities that are the most vulnerable to HIV and TB are remote, populated communities. The Tutu Truck was identified as an essential service to reach these people: bring the health care to them.

The truck specialises in HIV testing, as well a wealth of other essential services it offers full wellness checks, including blood pressure, family planning, and TB testing. What’s more, the service is accessible. Parking near schools or shopping centres, the Tutu Truck tries to ensure that there is no extra cost for a visit. Additionally, the truck stays open until after school has finished, ensuring that patients can find care without missing school or work. This service is especially important for empowering women who are seeking contraception.

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PrEP stands for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis. It is a daily drug that can be taken by people who don’t have HIV to prevent them from being infected with the virus. It can prevent HIV infection even if the virus enters the body through an exchange of sexual fluids or from an injection.

There are many studies that confirm that PrEP prevents HIV infection from both hetero- and homosexual intercourse, as well as one study that suggests PrEP could also be effective for people who inject drugs.

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Many nurses go through their healthcare career as unsung heroes. Strain and burden are symptoms that many caregivers have to cope with. Since nurses are acclimatised to stressful situations, they may not realise they themselves are stressed.

It’s the perfect time to thank the nurses and caregivers in your life and to pay special attention to how to care for your caregivers.

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We live in an age of incredible luxury. Many people today have never encountered diseases that were once rampant and harmful - all thanks to vaccinations. Unfortunately, not everyone has access to life-saving immunisation due to their remote living conditions or socio-governmental situations. Moreover, some people opt not to vaccinate themselves or their children, even when vaccines are freely available.

There are many reasons that people cite for opposition to vaccinations. These can be philosophical, religious or concerns about safety. Anti-vaccination movements have been around since vaccines were first created. Today, the internet is flooded with a lot of confusing and contradictory information about vaccinations. The same arguments and misconceptions are seen over and over again.

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